The 101st [NATO] Coalition's Active Headlines
Attention ALL of The 101st [NATO] Coalition's Members,


NOTICE


The Website is Undergoing Maintenance; if you "Notice" any [Flaws] (and/or) [Have Any Questions]; please, feel free to "ask" 
JustinMacGregor ; for: [Assistance] via. [Private Message].


* * We ARE accepting applications to join [[NATO] The 101st Mil-Sim Clan; (Military Simulation): (Mil-Sim) , [NATO] The 101st War Generals;(Run and Gun), (and/or) [NATO] The 101st Public Club; (Friendly Public Gaming Community)]. Please go fill out a RECRUITMENT APPLICATION if you are interested.* *    




Please make yourself familiar with The 101st [NATO] Coalition's [Website (and/or) "[Rules/Regulations]"] as this is our central information source. Take some time out to go to the Members list to view the current Ranks of our members. Get familiar with our Enlisted and Officers and check out the calendar page to see upcoming: [The 101st [NATO] Coalition Events] that you can participate in. Welcome, all to The 101st [NATO] Coalition and we will see you on the front line.




By, JustinMacGregor

Founder of The 101st [NATO] Coalition and Head of The 101st [NATO] Coalition Board of Directors Committee
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Awards
Marksmanship Ribbion
This is Awarded to 53rd SFOC Members who Recieve a 90% or Higher on their Marksmanship Training!
This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Marksmanship Ribbion
This is Awarded to 53rd SFOC Members who Recieve a 90% or Higher on their Marksmanship Training!
Administrator
Admin 
This is award is given to admins of the 53rd SFOC. After being accepted as a full time Admin of the Website!
Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon
The Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon was created in July 1997 and recognizes those members of the United States Marine Corps who have successfully trained and qualified as Marine Corps Drill Instructors. To qualify, a Marine must hold the  Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) of 0911 or must have served a successful tour of duty in one of the following positions:
  • Recruit Training Battalion Commander, Executive Officer, S-3, or Sergeant Major.
  • Recruit Training Company Commander,  Series Commander, or Assistant Series Commander.
  • Marine Corps Officer Candidate Company First Sergeant, Company Gunnery Sergeant, or Platoon Commanders.
  • Naval Aviation Officer Candidate School First Sergeant, Battalion Gunnery Sergeant, or Class Drill Instructors (Navy AOCS has since been disestablished).
Furthermore, the duties of the Marine's billet must be executed satisfactorily for three years before the award is authorized.
The Marine Corps Drill Instructor Ribbon is retroactively authorized to October 6, 1952. Multiple awards of the ribbon are denoted by  service stars
Marine Corps Combat Instructor Ribbon
Awarded to those who serve as an instructor in BCT Class or under a High Profile Leadership Role 

Multinational Force & Observers Medal
" Awarded for 30 days of service" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Inter-American Defense Board Medal
" Awarded for serving a tour of duty or on a staff or has instructed at the 53rd S.F.O.C " 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Armed Forces Reserve Medal
" Awarded for officers & Enlisted personnel of the US Armed forces reserve components " 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy & Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon
"Awarded for completion of 30 Days of training or Active duty with the S.F.O.C" 

Training = 1 Day 
Active Duty = 2 Days

The '''Navy and Marine Corps Overseas Service Ribbon''' was first proposed in 1968, but not authorized until 17 September 1986.  The ribbon is awarded to any member of the Navy or Marine Corps who completes one year of consecutive or cumulative duty at a permanent overseas duty station.


This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy Arctic Service Ribbon
"Awarded for completion of 28 Days (Consecutive or NON consecutive Days) at an arctic training facility" 

Awarded to officers and enlisted personnel for twenty-eight days, consecutive or non-consecutive, above the Arctic Circle after 1 January 1982. For personnel working at remote ice camps or divers working under the ice, each day of duty will count as two days when determining award eligibility. No more than one day of credit can be counted for flights in or out during any 24-hour period. Marine Corps personnel undergoing annual cold weather training above the Arctic Circle do not qualify for additional credit. The ribbon is issued for one time service only and there are no devices authorized for additional periods of Arctic service.  

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Sea Service Deployment Ribbon
"Awarded for deployment of 30 Navel classes on Navel maps or 3 Scrimmages on Navel Maps" 

The '''Sea Service Deployment Ribbon''' ('''SSDR''&#39 is a service award of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps which was authorized in May 1980 and retroactively authorized to 15 August 1974, coinciding with a temporary suspension in authority for award of the National Defense Service Medal between that date and 2 August 1990. It was the first type of sea service ribbon established in the U.S. Armed Forces.


The Sea Service Deployment Ribbon is granted to any member of the U.S. Navy or United States Marine Corps|U.S. Marine Corps assigned to a deploy-able unit (e.g., a ship (including submarines), aircraft squadron, air wing or air group, detachment, battalion, Marine Expeditionary Unit, Marine Air Ground Task Force, or other unit type that operates away from its assigned homeport) and is Military deployment|forward-deployed for a period of either 90 consecutive days or two periods of at least 80 days each within a given 12-month period; or 6 months stationed overseas in a forward deployed location.  Staffs of embarked Destroyer Squadrons (DESRONs), Amphibious Squadrons (PHIBRONs), Amphibious Readiness Groups (ARG), Expeditionary Strike Groups (ESGs), Carrier Strike Groups (CSGs) and similar units deployed within time period requirements are also eligible for award. 


When a ship's crew qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the ship is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the port and starboard side of the bulwark aft to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the commissioned life of the ship since August 1974.


When a U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps aviation squadron qualifies for the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, the squadron is authorized to paint and display the ribbon and award stars on the exterior or interior of their hangar or squadron spaces to designate the number of deployments conducted throughout the active life of that squadron since August 1974.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal
" Awarded for substantial volunteer service to the local 53rd S.F.O.C Community " 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Humanitarian Service Medal
" Awarded for meritorious participation in a significant military act or operation of a humanitarian nature or have rendered a special service to humankind" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
" Awarded for participation in any 53rd S.F.O.C operations, 53rd operations in direct support of friendly foreign clans" 
The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal may be authorized for three categories of operations: U.S. military operations; U.S. military operations in direct support of the United Nations; and U.S. operations of assistance to friendly foreign nations.
The medal shall be awarded only for operations for which no other U.S. campaign medal is approved, where a foreign armed opposition or imminent threat of hostile action was encountered.

Since its original conception in 1961, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal has been awarded for United States participation in over forty five designated military campaigns.  The first campaign of the AFEM was the Cuban Missile Crisis and the award was issued for military service between October 1962 and June 1963.  Following this original issuance, the AFEM was made retroactive to 1958 and issued for actions in Lebanon, Taiwan, Republic of the Congo, Quemoy and Matsu, and for duty in [[Berlin]] between 1961 and 1963.

During the early years of the Vietnam War, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal was issued for initial operations in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.  The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal was intended to replace the Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal and Navy Expeditionary Medal. Service Medals and Campaign Credit of the United States Navy,Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal In 1965, with the creation of the Vietnam Service Medal, the AFEM was discontinued for Vietnam War service.  As the Vietnam Service Medal was retroactively authorized, those personnel who had previously received the AFEM were granted the option to exchange the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal for the Vietnam Service Medal. In 1968, the AFEM was awarded for Naval operations in defense of the USS|Pueblo|AGER-2, which was seized by North Korea, as well as for Korean Service, and awarded for Thailand and Cambodia operations in 1973. Because of these awards during the Vietnam war period, some military personnel have been awarded both the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal & the Vietnam Service Medal. In 2003, with the creation of the [[Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal]], the AFEM was discontinued for Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. After 18 March 2003, some personnel became eligible for the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, as well as the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal. Only one medal may be awarded, however, and individuals or units that deployed to the Gulf for Operation Southern Watch, and then immediately transitioned to Iraq War|Operation Iraqi Freedom, are not eligible for both medals.

Beginning in 1992 an effort was begun to phase out the AFEM in favor of campaign specific medals and the newly created Armed Forces Service Medal.  The Armed Forces Service Medal was originally intended to be a replacement for the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, however the two awards are considered separate awards with different award criteria. The primary difference between the two is that the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal is normally awarded for combat operations and combat support missions.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Antarctica Service Medal
"Awarded for training or service between 15  training classes stationed on a (Snow) Map" 

To qualify for the Antarctica Service Medal, personnel must train or serve between fifteen to thirty days stationed on the Antarctic continent, defined as south of 60th parallel south|60 degrees latitude. Flight crews performing transport missions to Antarctica qualify for one day of service for each flight mission performed within a 24-hour time period.


This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
National Defense Service Medal
" Awarded for military service during periods of national emergence or any other periods designated by the secretary of defense"
== Must attend Recruit server 5 Continuous times when summoned to the server by a General ==

The National Defense Service Medal (NDSM) is awarded to anyone who serves on active duty in the United States military during the above time periods. Reserve Component service during the Korean and Vietnam periods, other than those Reserve Component personnel in a full-time status or on active duty greater than 89 days, did not qualify for award of the NDSM.


For service in the Gulf War, members of the Reserve Component (in good standing), to include the National Guard of the United States|National Guard, were initially awarded the NDSM when called to active duty service, but this was later expanded to include all members of the Reserve or National Guard in good standing on the Reserve Active Status List (or equivalent) during the eligibility period.


For service in the War on Terrorism, Selected Reserve and National Guard members need only to have been in good standing to receive the NDSM and no active duty service is required. Inactive Ready Reserve and Retired Reserve are not eligible to be awarded the NDSM unless called to active duty.


The medal is authorized to Cadets and Midshipmen at the service academies after they are sworn into service, as well as pre-commission officer candidates/trainees at the Officer Candidate Schools or Officer Training Schools of the various U.S. services; but is not granted to discharged or retired military personnel who did not serve in one of the above time periods; nor is it authorized for Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Cadets and Midshipmen at colleges and universities who enlisted in the inactive reserve (i.e., Obligated Reserve Section or ORS) during qualifying periods.


The NDSM ranks eleventh out of twenty-nine in the Awards and decorations of the United States Armed Forces By order of precedence|order of precedence of service medals. There is no time requirement for the medal's issuance, meaning that someone who joins the military for simply a few days, and then receives an entry level discharge, would technically be entitled to the NDSM; in practice, however, military clerks will not add the NDSM on a DD Form 214 if the service member performed duty for less than 90 days from the completion of their initial entry training.  This accounts for the medal's omission from a large number of "uncharacterized" and "entry level" separation documents.  Veterans who have this medal so omitted may apply to the military service departments to have the NDSM added to records via a DD Form 215.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal
" Awarded for LAND on foreign territory, engage in operations against armed opposition, or who operate under circumstances deemed to merit special recognition & for which no campaign medal has been awarded" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Selected Marine Corps Reserve Good Conduct Medal
" Awarded to members of the marine corps that have performed 3 Weeks of satisfactory duty with such service being free of disciplinary action" 

First created in 1925 as the ''Fleet Marine Reserve Medal'', this is the oldest of the Reserve Good Conduct Medals.  In 1939 the name of the medal was changed to the ''Organized Marine Corps Reserve Medal''.  In 1984, the award adopted its current name.  As of January 1, 1996, the qualifying period of service was changed from four to three years to mirror the requirements of the Good Conduct Medal.  Additional awards are denoted by bronze service stars.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Good Conduct Medal
" Awarded for exemplary behavior, efficiency & fidelity in active (Officers) military service" 

The criteria for a Good Conduct Medal is defined by Executive Orders 8809, 9323, and 10444.  The medal is awarded to any active-duty enlisted member of the United States military who completes three consecutive years of "honorable and faithful service".  Such service implies that a standard enlistment was completed without any non-judicial punishment, disciplinary infractions, or court martial offenses.  If a service member commits an offense, the three-year mark "resets" and a service member must perform an additional three years of service without having to be disciplined, before the Good Conduct may be authorized.


During times of war, the Good Conduct Medal may be awarded for one year of faithful service. The Good Conduct Medal may also be awarded posthumously, to any service member killed in the line of duty.


===Reserve Components===
Service for the Good Conduct Medal must be performed on active duty; it is not awarded to enlisted members of the military reserve or United States National Guard|National Guard]] for reserve duty (though reservists are eligible if they complete sufficient active service).  The various services have established separate Reserve Good Conduct Medals, albeit under various names, as a comparable award available to enlisted Reserve and National Guard members who satisfactorily perform annual training, drill duty and any additional active duty of less than 3 consecutive years duration. The exception is the United States Navy Reserve|Navy Reserve which discontinued the award as of 1 January 2014. Navy Reservists now earn time towards the Navy Good Conduct medal, and any time previously earned towards an unrewarded Reserve Good Conduct Medal is automatically carried over to the Navy Good Conduct Medal.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Prisoner of War Ribbon
" Awarded for being taken prisoner & held captive while engaged in an action against an enemy of the 53rd S.F.O.C , While engaged in military operations involving conflict against an opposing foreign force; while serving with friendly forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force to which the 53rd S.F.O.C is not a belligerent"

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Meritorious Unit Commendation
"Awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service, heroic deeds, or valorous actions"
== Awarded after receiving 2 Armed Forces Expeditionary Ribbons ==

The Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy on July 17, 1967. The ribbon is awarded in the name of the Secretary of the Navy to units of the U.S. Navy, United States Marine Corps, and United States Coast Guard members when operating as part of the U.S. Navy, such as Operation Market Time during the Vietnam war. As a result of Operation Eldorado Canyon on 14-15 April 1986, Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman Jr. awarded the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation to the men and women of a United States Air Force unit, the 48th Fighter Wing|48th Tactical Fighter Wing, the "Statue of Liberty Wing," whose F-111 aircraft participated in the operation.  This the only U.S. Air Force unit so awarded.  To be eligible for the award, the unit must have performed service of a character comparable to that which would merit the award of a Bronze Star Medal in a combat situation, or achievement of like caliber in a non-combat situation, to an individual. 


The Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon ranks below the Navy Unit Commendation. Additional awards of the ribbon are denoted by bronze and silver service stars.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy Unit Commendation
" Awarded to squad leaders for unit heroism lesser then that required of a Presidential Unit Citation or non combat service which was outstanding when compared to other units or organizations performing similar service" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Joint Meritorious Unit Award
"Awarded to joint units (Alliances) or units tasked to perform a joint mission" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Presidential Unit Citation
"Awarded for gallantry, determination & esprit de corps in accomplishing its mission under extremely difficult & hazardous conditions."

The Navy citation was established by EO|9050 on 6 February 1942.


The Navy version has blue, yellow, and red horizontal stripes, and is the only Navy ribbon having horizontal stripes. To distinguish between the two versions of the Presidential Unit Citation, the Navy version is typically referred to as the "Navy and Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation," while the Army and Air Force refer to the decoration simply as the Presidential Unit Citation. These are only worn by persons who meet the criteria at the time it is awarded to the unit. Unlike the Army, those who later join the unit do not wear it on a temporary basis.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Combat Action Ribbon
"Awarded for active participation in ground or surface combat on or after December 7th 1941" 

The Navy Combat Action Ribbon (CAR) was established during the Vietnam War by a Secretary of the Navy Notice, dated February 17, 1969 with retroactive award to March 1, 1961. The CAR (Navy/Marine Corps version) is awarded to members of the Navy, Marine, and Coast Guard (when operating under the control of the Navy) personnel with the grade of captain/colonel and below (Coast Guard, captain and below), who have actively participated in ground or surface combat.


In October 1999, World War I and Korean War Veterans became retroactively eligible for the Navy Combat Action Ribbon by Public Law 106-65 on Oct. 5, 1999, which permitted the United States Secretary of the Navy|Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) to award the Combat Action Ribbon to a member of the Navy or Marine Corps for participation in ground or surface combat during any period on or after December 7, 1941, and or before March 1, 1961, if the Secretary determines that the member has not been previously recognized in an appropriate manner for such participation.


Sailors and Marines in clandestine or special operations where their ability to return fire is curtailed may be deemed eligible.  Personnel who earn the Combat Infantryman Badge, Combat Medical Badge, Combat Action Badge, or Air Force Combat Action Medal|Combat Action Medal while assigned to United States Army or United States Air Force units, or who earned such for prior service in said service branch's may be authorized to wear the Combat Action Ribbon upon application to the Department of the Navy.


In Jan 2013 the awarding criteria was expanded to include dangerous exposure to IEDs, Mines, and scatterable munitions, be it the detonantion of such or direct action taken to disable, render safe, or destroy such, can be deemed eligible if detonated or specifically emplaced by the enemy.  Previously it applied only to exposure to IEDs detonated by the enemy.  Eligibility under this criterion is retroactive only to 7 October 2001.


Blanket lists of units and operations whose members or participants are deemed to be "in-combat", and thus potentially eligible, can be found in OPNAVNOTE 1650 (for specific units & ships) & in chapter 2, appendix E of recent SECNAVINST's (for specific operations & ships) though "Neither service in a combat area nor being awarded the Purple Heart Medal automatically makes a service member eligible" and specific sailors and marines may receive the ribbon in recognition of individual actions or various minor operations.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy & Marine Corps Achievement Medal
"Awarded for meritorious service or achievement in either combat or noncombat situations based on sustained performance or specific achievement or a superlative nature but which does not warrant a commendation medal or higher" 

The '''Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal''' ('''NAM''&#39, is the United States Navy] and United States Marine Corps' version of the Achievement Medal. The United States Navy was the first branch of the United States Armed Forces to award such a medal, doing so in 1961, when it was dubbed the “Secretary of the Navy Commendation for Achievement Medal”. This title was shortened in 1967 to simply, the "'''Navy Achievement Medal'''". On 19 August 1994, to recognize those of the United States Marine Corps who had received the Navy Achievement Medal, the name of the decoration was officially changed to the "Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal". The award is referred to in shorthand speech as a "NAM."


====Chain of Command approval====


From its inception in the early 1960s to 2002, the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal could not be approved by the commanding officers of ships, submarines, aviation squadron, or shore activities who held the rank of Commander (O-5). Awards for crew members had to be submitted to the Commodore or Air Wing Commander or the first appropriate O-6 in the chain of command for approval, who then signed the award and returned it. This led to a dramatically lower awarding rate when compared to similar size units in the Army or Air Force awarding their own achievement medals, especially considering that those services did not establish their respective achievement medals until the 1980s. Since 2002 the commanding officers of aviation squadrons and ships have had the authority to award NAMs without submission to higher authority.  For the Army, battalion commanders (or the first O-5 in a soldier's chain of command) is the approving authority for the Army Achievement Medal.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Joint Service Achievement Medal
The Joint Service Achievement Medal was created in 1983. This award was considered a Department of Defense decoration senior to the service department Achievement Medals.== Award for Generals that attend joint ops == 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy & Marine Corps Commendation Medal
Same as the " Joint Service Medal" 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Joint Service Commendation Medal
"Awarded for heroism, meritorious achievement, or meritorious service." 

After the First World War, the United States Department of the Navy Department of the Navy authorized the Navy Commendation Star as an attachment to the World War I Victory Medal United States World War I Victory Medal.  The star was identical to the Silver Citation Star, but not comparable, as the later recognized heroic combat actions, while the Navy Commendation Star denoted those who had been cited for meritorious achievement by the United States Secretary of the Navy Secretary of the Navy.


An independent '''Navy Commendation Ribbon''' was established in November 1943.  On 22 March 1950 a metal pendant (of the same design as the pendant of the Army Commendation Medal} was authorized and the Commendation Ribbon was renamed the Navy Commendation Ribbon with Metal Pendant.  This award was re-designated as the Navy Commendation Medal in September 1960, and renamed the '''Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal''' in 1994. This decoration was previously awarded only by flag rank operational commanders, requiring the signature of an admiral or general officer in the grade of U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Officer pay grades O-7, allowing interpretation of the criteria for which the medal may be awarded.  Authority to award this decoration was later expanded to captains and colonels in the grade of U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Officer pay grades O-6 currently holding operational command as a Commodore United States commodore, carrier air wing commander or commanding officer.


In contrast to the Army and the Air Force, in the United States Navy U.S. Navy and United States Marine Corps U.S. Marine Corps, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal has historically considered its commendation medal to be a higher level and less frequently awarded decoration.  Outside of those instances where it has been awarded for combat action with a Combat V device, it has typically been reserved for Department Head level officers at the U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Officer pay grades O-4 level, senior Navy Chief Petty Officers (CPO) and senior Marine Corps Non-Commissioned Officers (SNCO) at the U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Enlisted pay grades E-8 and U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Enlisted pay grades E-9 level as an "end of tour" award in a given command/organization/unit, and, following a full career, as a retirement award for enlisted personnel between pay grades E-6 and E-9. For more junior personnel, it has occasionally been awarded as an "impact award" for a significant contribution of service, to include those instances of combat service where it has included the Combat V device.  In contrast, the awarding of the Army Commendation Medal in the U.S. Army and the Air Force Commendation Medal in the U.S. Air Force is not limited to senior service members, and can be awarded to junior NCOs in the grade of U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Enlisted pay grades E-6 and below (with some recipients as low as U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Enlisted pay grades E-3) and junior officers in the grade U.S. uniformed services pay grades, Officer pay grades O-3 and below.  However, since the early 2000s, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal has been observed as being increasingly awarded to junior USN officers in pay grade O-3 as an "end of tour" award in a given command/unit/organization in a manner similar to that employed by the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force since the late 1960s.


Recipient members of the United States Marine Corps, U.S. Marine Corps have always been issued the Navy's commendation medal and there is not a separate commendation medal intended only for Marines.  This lack of difference was recognized on August 19, 1994 when Secretary of the Navy John Howard Dalton changed the name of the Navy Commendation Medal to the '''''Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal'''''.

The United States Coast Guard U.S. Coast Guard awards a separate '''Coast Guard Commendation Medal''', with a ribbon similar in design to that of its Navy and Marine Corps counterpart.  Initially established as the Coast Guard Commendation Ribbon in 1947, it was redesignated as the Coast Guard Commendation Medal in 1959.  Criteria for its award has paralleled that of the Navy and Marine Corps.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Air Medal
"Awarded for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight" 

The Air Medal was established by Executive Order|9158, signed by Franklin Delano Roosevelt|Franklin D. Roosevelt, on 11 May 1942.  The Air Medal was awarded retroactive to 8 September 1939. The medal is awarded to anyone who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Armed Forces of the United States, distinguishes himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.


The original award criteria set by an Army Policy Letter (dated 25 September 1942) was for one award of the Air Medal
*per each naval vessel or three enemy aircraft in flight confirmed destroyed. (An entire aircrew would be credited for the destruction of a ship but only the pilot or gunner responsible would be credited for destroying an enemy aircraft).

*per twenty-five (25) operational flights during which exposure to enemy fire is probable and expected.    
*per one-hundred (100) operational flights during which exposure to enemy fire is not expected.


These criteria were later altered by the commanding generals of each numbered Air Force to fit the conditions of their theater of operations and to maintain morale. The Distinguished Flying Cross (United States)|Distinguished Flying Cross would usually be awarded for roughly twice to five times the requirements of the Air Medal. This led to automatic "score card" awards of the Air Medal and Distinguished Flying Cross for completing a set number of operational missions rather than distinguished service, meritorious action, or bravery as had been intended.


On 5 August 1943 "score card" awards for completing a set number of operational flights were officially abolished by a Headquarters Army Air Forces Awards Board memorandum. This was due to the embarrassment when airmen who had received the Air Medal for "score carding" five missions or more being later removed from flying duties for "Combat stress reaction|lack of moral fibre".< Commanders could still issue the awards on those grounds, but the recipient must perform exceptional or meritorious service as well.


===Army Air Forces (1942-1947)===


During World War II the medal's award criteria varied widely depending on the theater of operations, the aircraft flown, and the missions accomplished.


In Europe the airspace was considered completely controlled by the enemy and heavy air defenses were encountered - so the criteria was altered from than that of the original medal. Bomber, photographic reconnaissance, or observation crewmembers and air transport pilots received it for five sorties, fighter pilots received it for ten sorties, and individual pilots or aircrewmen received one award per enemy aircraft shot down.


Elsewhere in the Pacific and China Burma India Theater|CBI the pilots and crews flew mostly over uncontrolled or contested airspace for long hours and lighter air defenses were encountered, so much higher criteria were used.


This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Meritorious Service Medal
" Awarded for outstanding meritorious achievement or service to the 53rd S.F.O.C" == Awarded to ANY Generals that attend a match 2x == 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Defense Meritorious Service Medal
"Awarded for non-combat outstanding achievement or meritorious service" 

== Awarded for Generals that acknowledge enemy targets in servers ==

The medal was first created on 3 November 1977 by President Jimmy Carter under Executive Order|12019 to recognize non-combat meritorious achievement or service while serving in a joint assignment. The recognized service is typically for a period of time greater than 12 months, encompassing a recipients entire joint assignment, including extensions. The required achievement or service, is of a lesser degree than that required for award of the Defense Superior Service Medal, but must have been accomplished with distinction.


A joint assignment "connotes activities, operations, or organizations in which elements of more than one Armed Forces of the United States, as reflected in joint manpower documents or the Joint Duty Assignment List, perform joint missions under the auspices of the Office of the Secretary of Defense; the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; or the commander of a Combatant Command". Service members assigned to or attached to a Joint Task Force as individuals, not members of a specific military service's unit, can be eligible for the DMSM. Members of service specific units are eligible for awards of personal decorations from their parent service. Personnel serving with jointly manned staffs within Allied Command Europe, Allied Command Transformation|Allied Command Atlantic, the NATO Military Committee, and military agencies associated with functions of the military or other joint activities as may be designated are also included.


Award of the DMSM is typically limited to officers in pay grade O-4 and above, with O-5 and above being the more common instance; chief warrant officers in pay grade W-3 and above; and enlisted personnel in pay grade E-8 and above.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Purple Heart
"Awarded for being wounded or killed in any action against an enemy of the 53rd S.F.O.C or as a result of an act of any such enemy or opposing armed forces" 

== Awarded for receiving a message by opposing forces (Proof of bullying or Team killed need to be recorded)  == 

The Purple Heart is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Services after April 5, 1917, has been wounded or killed. Specific examples of services which warrant the Purple Heart include any action against an enemy of the United States; any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged; while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party; as a result of an act of any such enemy of opposing armed forces; or as the result of an act of any hostile foreign force. After 28 March 1973, it may be awarded as a result of an international terrorist attack against the United States or a foreign nation friendly to the United States, recognized as such an attack by the Secretary of the Army, or jointly by the Secretaries of the separate armed services concerned if persons from more than one service are wounded in the attack. After 28 March 1973, as a result of military operations while serving outside the territory of the United States as part of a peacekeeping force.


The Purple Heart differs from all other decorations in that an individual is not "recommended" for the decoration; rather he or she is entitled to it upon meeting specific criteria. A Purple Heart is awarded for the first wound suffered under conditions indicated above, but for each subsequent award an oak leaf cluster is worn in lieu of another medal. Not more than one award will be made for more than one wound or injury received at the same instant.


A "wound" is defined as an injury to any part of the body from an outside force or agent sustained under one or more of the conditions listed above. A physical lesion is not required; however, the wound for which the award is made must have required treatment by a medical officer and records of medical treatment for wounds or injuries received in action must have been made a matter of official record. When contemplating an award of this decoration, the key issue that commanders must take into consideration is the degree to which the enemy caused the injury. The fact that the proposed recipient was participating in direct or indirect combat operations is a necessary prerequisite, but is not sole justification for award. The Purple Heart is not awarded for non-combat injuries.


Enemy-related injuries which ''justify'' the award of the Purple Heart include: injury caused by enemy bullet, Fragmentation (weaponry)|shrapnel, or other projectile created by enemy action; injury caused by enemy placed land mine, naval mine, or Booby trap|trap; injury caused by enemy released Chemical, biological, radio logical, and nuclear|chemical, biological, or nuclear agent]]; injury caused by vehicle or aircraft accident resulting from enemy fire; and, concussion injuries caused as a result of enemy generated explosions.


Injuries or wounds which ''do not qualify'' for award of the Purple Heart include frostbite or trench foot injuries; heat stroke; food poisoning not caused by enemy agents; chemical, biological, or nuclear agents not released by the enemy; Post traumatic stress disorder|battle fatigue; disease not directly caused by enemy agents; accidents, to include explosive, aircraft, vehicular, and other accidental wounding not related to or caused by enemy action; self-inflicted wounds (e.g., a soldier accidentally fires their own gun and the bullet strikes his or her leg), except when in the heat of battle, and not involving gross negligence.


This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Bronze Star Medal

" Awarded for heroic or meritorious achievement or service" = Awarded after receiving 3 merit ribbons =


The Bronze Star Medal was established by Executive Order 9419, 4 February 1944 (superseded by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, as amended by Executive Order 13286, 28 February 2003)

The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded by the Secretary of a military department or the Secretary of Homeland Security with regard to the Coast Guard when not operating as a service in the Navy, or by such military commanders, or other appropriate officers as the Secretary concerned may designate, to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard of the United States, after 6 December 1941, distinguishes, or has distinguished, herself or himself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight—


a) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;

b) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or
c) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.


The acts of heroism are of a lesser degree than required for the award of the Silver Star. The acts of merit or acts of valor must be less than that required for the Legion of Merit but must nevertheless have been meritorious and accomplished with distinction. The Bronze Star Medal is awarded only to service members in combat who are receiving imminent danger pay.


The Bronze Star Medal (without the "V" device) may be awarded to each member of the Armed Forces of the United States who, after 6 December 1941, was cited in orders or awarded a certificate for exemplary conduct in ground combat against an armed enemy between 7 December 1941 and 2 September 1945. For this purpose, the US Army's Combat Infantryman Badge or Combat Medical Badge award is considered as a citation in orders. Documents executed since 4 August 1944 in connection with recommendations for the award of decorations of higher degree than the Bronze Star Medal cannot be used as the basis for an award under this paragraph.


Effective 11 September 2001, the [[Meritorious Service Medal (United States)|Meritorious Service Medal]] may also be bestowed in lieu of the Bronze Star Medal (without Combat "V" device) for meritorious achievement in a designated combat theater.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy & Marine Corps Medal
"Awarded for distinguishing oneself by heroism not involving actual conflict  with an enemy of the 53rd S.F.O.C Clan"= Awarded after achieving 3 Navy & Marine corps Medals = 


As the senior non-combat award for heroism, this award hinges on the actual level of personal "life threatening" risk experienced by the awardee. For heroic performance to rise to this level it must be clearly established that the act involved very specific life-threatening risk to the awardee.

During the mid-20th century, the Navy and Marine Corps Medal has been awarded instead of the Silver or Gold Lifesaving Medal, for sea rescues involving risk to life. This is due primarily to the creation of a variety of additional military decorations that are often considered more prestigious than the Lifesaving Medal.

The Navy and Marine Corps Medal was first bestowed during World War II. A famous recipient was President John F. Kennedy who was awarded the medal as Commanding Officer of  Motor Torpedo Boat PT-109 during World War II.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Distinguished Flying Cross
"Awarded for heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight"= Awarded for 5 Ariel superiority medals =


This act provided for award “to any person, while serving in any capacity with the Air Corps of the Army of the United States, including the National Guard and the Organized Reserves, or with the United States Navy, since the 6th day of April 1917, has distinguished, or who, after the approval of this Act, distinguishes himself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight.”

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Legion of Merit
" Awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services & achievements" = Awarded to colonels & above after receiving 2 Bronze Medals = 


When the Legion of Merit is awarded to members of the Uniformed Services of the United States, it is awarded without reference to degree. The criteria are "for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements" and is typically reserved for senior officers at O-6 level and above, typically in connection with senior leadership/command positions or other senior positions of significant responsibility.


This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Defense Superior Service Medal

"Awarded for superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility" = Awarded for 5 Call to arms & 5 Meritorious Service Medal  = 


The Defense Superior Service Medal is awarded by the [[United States Secretary of Defense|Secretary of Defense]] to members of the United States Armed Forces who have rendered superior meritorious service while serving in a position of great responsibility.  This service must be as part of a joint activity.  The award is generally for a period of time exceeding 12 months and encompassing an entire joint assignment.  Service members assigned to or attached to a Joint Task Force as individuals, not members of a specific military service's unit, can be eligible for the DSSM.  The DSSM has also been awarded to a small cohort of U.S. military officers serving as astronauts for service leading up to and during [[space shuttle]] missions carrying classified and unclassified Department of Defense payloads.  In these cases, the 12 month time period was considered to include the training period prior to that actual space flight, said training which typically exceeded a year in duration.   


Members of service specific units are eligible for awards of personal decorations from their parent service.  The Defense Superior Service Medal is specifically intended to recognize exceptionally superior service, and to honor an individual’s accomplishments over a sustained period.  Joint or Department of Defense awards, including the Defense Superior Service Medal, may be awarded posthumously.

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Silver Star
"Awarded for Gallantry in action against an enemy of the 53rd S.F.O.C Mil-Sim Clan."= 3 Bronze stars are required after successful completion of 3 Enemy clan battles = 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded for exceptionally meritorious service to the 53rd S.F.O.C  in a duty of great responsibility.  = Generals = 

Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Awarded for exceptionally distinguished performance of duty contributing to National security or defense of the United States. = Awarded to generals that have been through clan battle = 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Navy Cross
Awarded to individuals who distinguishes himself or herself in action by extraordinary heroism in combat not justifying the Medal of Honor. 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
Medal of Honor
Awarded for Conspicuous gallantry & intrepidity at the risk of life above & beyond the call of duty. 

This hasn't been awarded to anyone yet.
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